Gites – Normandy Lets http://normandylets.com/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 21:54:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://normandylets.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-06T153417.724-150x150.png Gites – Normandy Lets http://normandylets.com/ 32 32 Vacation rental owners in France take action for over €200 in music royalties https://normandylets.com/vacation-rental-owners-in-france-take-action-for-over-e200-in-music-royalties/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 14:26:57 +0000 https://normandylets.com/vacation-rental-owners-in-france-take-action-for-over-e200-in-music-royalties/ Owners of bed and breakfasts, gites and vacation rentals in France are writing to their MPs and senators about recently received letters from music royalty claiming €198.01 excl. VAT (€223.97 excl. VAT) per year for music played on the spot. The Society of Authors, Composers and Music Publishers (Sacem) sent the letters stating that: “If […]]]>

Owners of bed and breakfasts, gites and vacation rentals in France are writing to their MPs and senators about recently received letters from music royalty claiming €198.01 excl. VAT (€223.97 excl. VAT) per year for music played on the spot.

The Society of Authors, Composers and Music Publishers (Sacem) sent the letters stating that: “If you have a broadcasting device – radio, television, CD player – you must register to pay our annual tourist accommodation in compliance with the rules.”

Read more: B&B owners in France receive music royalty bill for locals

Hotels have to pay royalties – Copyright – play music at home but they are not alone.

According to the Sacem website, the fee also applies to “bed and breakfast, lodgesand furnished holiday rentals”.

There is a 20% discount for owners who have previously declared their use of broadcasting devices, specifies Sacem.

It initially appeared that the charge covered all music-playing devices in bedrooms and common areas.

However, the government has since confirmed that it only applies:

“The amount does not correspond to the size of the accommodation and the rates”

Christian Biancaniello, president of the association of holiday rental owners Clévacances France, told La Dépêche: “The amount does not seem at all proportional to the devices that travelers can use.

“This sum is unfair given the type of activity we pursue. We’re not saying artists shouldn’t be rewarded” for their work, Biancaniello added, “but you can’t compare a large hotel network to a vacation rental or a guest rooms.

“The levy imposed does not take into account the size of the accommodation, its opening hours, its rates per night or the rental costs.”

However, if the owners do not pay, they receive another letter reminding them of the need to be in “legal compliance” with the relevant regulations and threatening to take the case to the Court of Cassation. Owners who still refuse to pay face a fine of up to €300,000.

Members of Clévacances wrote to their deputies and senators on this subject, arguing that: “We are emerging from two years of pandemic and since 90%, even 95%, of our owners of seasonal rentals are non-professionals, they have had bear the pause of the activity without assistance.

They added that this new charge comes against a backdrop of “double taxation, increasingly stringent tax reforms and regulations” and “is starting to be too, far too much”.

Sacem defends the rules of copyright

Sacem did not respond to recent requests for comment, but had previously told Le Parisien: “Our operations are legal, they respond to a project of public interest and registered in the Intellectual Property Code.

“When copyrighted works are broadcast – either directly or in the form of recordings (in a commercial setting such as a vacation rental), it is an act of communication to the public that is subject to copyright rules. .”

The fee imposed by Sacem is calculated on the basis of the assumption that the premises will welcome guests for 105 to 110 days per year on average, which means that the owners must pay €2 for each of these days.

Related Articles

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Veteran backed for Cheltenham glory as publisher Du Gite excludes Paddy Power | Horse racing news https://normandylets.com/veteran-backed-for-cheltenham-glory-as-publisher-du-gite-excludes-paddy-power-horse-racing-news/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 13:24:16 +0000 https://normandylets.com/veteran-backed-for-cheltenham-glory-as-publisher-du-gite-excludes-paddy-power-horse-racing-news/ John Grossick (racingpost.com/photos) ” title=”Editor Du Gite: excluded from the Paddy Power Gold Cup” class=”js-imageLoader” data-at-xn=”https://www.rp-assets.com/images/news/2021/12/ 12/102178-medium.jpeg” data-br-n=”https://www.rp-assets.com/images/news/2021/12/12/102178-medium.jpeg” data-br-m=” https://www.rp-assets.com/images/news/2021/12/12/102178-large.jpeg” data-br-w=”https://www.rp-assets.com/images/news /2021/12/12/102178-large.jpeg” data-br-xw=”https://www.rp-assets.com/images/news/2021/12/12/102178-large.jpeg” onclick= “return false;”> Publisher Du Gite: excluded from the Paddy Power Gold Cup John Grossick (racingpost.com/photos) By Matt Rennie UPDATED AT 1:24 PM, NOVEMBER 11, 2022 Publisher Du Gite will not participate […]]]>

John Grossick (racingpost.com/photos)

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Publisher Du Gite: excluded from the Paddy Power Gold Cup

John Grossick (racingpost.com/photos)

By Matt Rennie

Publisher Du Gite will not participate in tomorrow’s Paddy Power Gold Cup (2.20) after being declared a non-runner in the race on Friday morning.

The eight-year-old Gary Moore-trained boy won two of his four starts on the track, including at last year’s November meeting, as well as fourth place in the Grand Annual at the Cheltenham Festival, but will not make no offer to add to this count.

He was declared a non-runner because his blood test was not normal, according to the BHA racing administration, which leaves a maximum field of 15 for Saturday’s feature.


Ballyandy backed for more Cheltenham glory

The popular Ballyandy performer continues to be backed as a favorite in the pursuit of veterans Glenfarclas handicap (2.55) as he attempts to add another winner to his Cheltenham run.

The 11-year-old clinched Champion Bumper in 2016 and was called a “class horse” in the 2m4f race by trainer Nigel Twiston-Davies on Thursday.

Edward Whitaker

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Ballyandy: Can he still win at Cheltenham?

Ballyandy: Can he still win at Cheltenham?

Edward Whitaker

Ballyandy showed his zest to stay third when he returned to Perth in September and was down 9-4 (from 3) to claim an 11th career success.

The veterans pursuit on the map replaces the usual cross-country pursuit, which was moved to Cheltenham’s Trials Day game in January due to the lack of good terrain on the course.

Updated at 11:25 a.m.


Market Movers

1.10
11.
Fine molding 9-2 (from 6)
13. astigar 9-2 (from 11-2)

2.55
2. Ballyandy 9-4 (from 3-1)


Will changed to good for the opening of the November meeting

The start to Cheltenham for the start of the three-day November meeting has accelerated following dry weather and winds overnight.

The ground had been described as good to soft, good in places Thursday evening, but new strong winds throughout the night caused conditions to change Friday morning.

Race director Jon Pullin said: “We had a very dry day yesterday with strong winds. It was all day and it continued all night so we changed it to good ground all over. .”

While the winds aren’t expected to die down until early afternoon, Pullin hopes that won’t lead to conditions picking up further before the six-race map kicks off at 1:10.

He added: “It is due to die out around noon today so hopefully conditions can be maintained as they are.”

Posted at 8:30 a.m.


Non-runners

1.10
17 Cluain Aodha
20 Land of my delights

1.45
9 Mr Lecoq

4.00
2 desert friend


Read Friday’s Cheltenham previews:

1.45 Cheltenham: Gray Diamond set to deliver more handicap success for Sam Thomas and Dai Walters

2.20 Cheltenham: ‘He’s got a big chance’ – who can join a classy rookie honor roll?

2.55 Cheltenham: ‘Horse of class’ Ballyandy is a firm favourite, but can he be beaten?

3:30 p.m. Cheltenham: Can Willie Mullins weave a little more Cheltenham magic with Hubrisko?


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FIRST PUBLICATION AT 8:35 AM, NOVEMBER 11, 2022

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Who wins the Paddy Power Gold Cup? Assessing the main contenders for the big race | Horse racing news https://normandylets.com/who-wins-the-paddy-power-gold-cup-assessing-the-main-contenders-for-the-big-race-horse-racing-news/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://normandylets.com/who-wins-the-paddy-power-gold-cup-assessing-the-main-contenders-for-the-big-race-horse-racing-news/ Saturday’s Paddy Power Gold Cup (2.20 Cheltenham) is the big race of the weekend, with French Dynamite the favorite to hand Ireland a rare victory in the prestigious handicap race. Here, we assess its claims, along with four other top contenders. Form 161-31 Strengths The ante-post favorite was a Grade 3 winner in his Novice […]]]>

Saturday’s Paddy Power Gold Cup (2.20 Cheltenham) is the big race of the weekend, with French Dynamite the favorite to hand Ireland a rare victory in the prestigious handicap race. Here, we assess its claims, along with four other top contenders.


Form 161-31

Strengths The ante-post favorite was a Grade 3 winner in his Novice Pursuit campaign before ending his season with a solid third at the Punchestown Festival. He came back with a three-length victory over the hurdles at Thurles last month.

Weaknesses His credentials as well handicapped for that are solid, but the big concern is Ireland’s shocking record in the race, having won it just once this century with Tranquil Sea in 2009.

Odds 4-1

What they say

Mouse Morris, trainer (after his victory at Thurles): “You can’t fault that performance. He’s quite difficult to place because he’s maybe just a bit short of a ranked horse, so that could be a liability. He’ll come back to the fences and I think that he will go back on his trip by the end of the season.”

Form 1132/3

Strengths A winning hunter as a 2nd year in his Novice campaign and returned from a 603-day layoff when a solid third, beaten by a length and a half, in the Old Roan Chase at Aintree last month.

Weaknesses There is always a risk that the “rebound” factor will play its part when returning from such a long absence.

Odds 7-1

What they say

Jamie Snowden, Coach: “He took Aintree well and the plan was always prep and then the Paddy Power. I was hoping to use a race at Market Rasen which we won with Kiltealy Briggs the week before, but the ground was a bit lively. It would have been better to have that extra week, but he hasn’t missed a beat since.”

Form 24341-

Strengths Has been in fine form since coming under the care of Sam Thomas last year and finished last season with a big win in Year 2 Limited Handicap at the new Cheltenham course in April.

Weaknesses Rivals with a high rating of 150, having been raised 7 pounds by the handicapper for his on-track heroism last season. Was also held well by some re-entry rivals at the Cheltenham Festival in March.

Odds 7-1

Form 1P383

Strengths A year ago he easily won a handicap pursuit at Newbury and found his form when he was third in a Novice Year 2 pursuit at Ayr on the day of the Scottish Grand National.

Weaknesses Didn’t seem to improve on his win at Newbury and disappointed in his lone run at Cheltenham in an eighth length 31 in the Grand Annual at the festival.

Odds 10-1

What they say

Coach Paul Nicholls (in his Racing Post stable tour): “He needs to be held back in a fast two or two and a half mile race and is the type to go well into a big handicap when they go hard in front and he can come in late. The Paddy Power Gold Cup seems ideal and Cheltenham will be his first race. He underwent a respiratory operation this summer.

Form 71P3-1

Strengths Remains unexposed on the fences and put in a stunning performance on his handicap hunting bow winning easily by 25 lengths at Stratford late last month.

Weaknesses His form was hit and miss during his rookie-hunting campaign last season and will need to challenge a career-high 145 if he is to win.

Odds 10-1

What they say

Dan Skelton, Coach: “It would have taken rain and rain for this horse to run, but we always held him in high regard. He was always going to be a horse that came forward and I was happy to see what I saw back home when he won at Stratford last month If there wasn’t enough rain for Paddy Power we would wait for the Gold Cup in December at Cheltenham He is a good horse and it wouldn’t surprise me if he jumped grade 2 [this season].”


Other suitors

Gite Editor thrived around Cheltenham, winning two of his four starts on the track, but was unproven on this trip, while happygolucky is a high class handicapper but must defy a long absence if he lines up. Top weight Mr Fisher won another 2nd year last year, but stopped in 2020, while Cool Codythe winner that day, could be dangerous given his fantastic Cheltenham record.


Paddy Power Gold Cup (2.20 Cheltenham, Saturday)

Power of rice: 4 French Dynamite, 7 Ga Law, Stolen Silver, 10 Il Ridoto, Midnight River, 12 Editeur De Gite, Shakem Up’Arry, Nassalam, Coole Cody, 14 bar


Read this next:

Market movers from Cheltenham – including runner Emmet Mullins now 5-1 from 12-1


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FIRST PUBLICATION AT 7:00 AM, NOVEMBER 8, 2022

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Gites de France: a thing of the past or are gite owners missing out? https://normandylets.com/gites-de-france-a-thing-of-the-past-or-are-gite-owners-missing-out/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 09:21:41 +0000 https://normandylets.com/gites-de-france-a-thing-of-the-past-or-are-gite-owners-missing-out/ Gites de France has been in business for over sixty years and is a well known label throughout France; However, as a gite owner, what are the actual benefits of being a Gite de France subscriber, if any? (Find out more about the history of Gîtes de France and how to find a gîte). To […]]]>

Gites de France has been in business for over sixty years and is a well known label throughout France; However, as a gite owner, what are the actual benefits of being a Gite de France subscriber, if any? (Find out more about the history of Gîtes de France and how to find a gîte).

To me, it had seemed a bit pricey, and I had heard rumors that it might be a little over the top, so I wanted to probe further and hear it from the horse’s mouth.

Maxime informed me that with partnership links with more than 1000 companies in France and discounts and preferential rates negotiated with many companies and tourist attractions, it may be time to take a closer look at what is on offer. He had my attention.

First, gite owners have access to a dedicated local team who know you and your properties, as they visit your gite before any agreement. As you may know, word of mouth and local recommendations can be the difference between a sluggish gite business and a booming and in-demand gite business. So, a dedicated team that cares about you and knows your business could be a big plus.

This team can manage all your reservations, payments, tourist tax and insurance, or you can choose to manage your own reservations if you prefer. Gite owners also have access to a system that will sync all your calendars, create and track your booking contracts, and collect feedback from your guests, which is marketing gold.

Among other selling points, you can directly modify your photographs and your advertisement online on the national and departmental pages, as well as upload all your income for your tax declarations. Arguably, streamlining administrative work in this way is highly beneficial and time-saving.

Classification of gîtes and tailor-made packages

This dedicated team, as the lovely Maxime explained, can also advise you on your business development strategy and arrange your gite grading visit (where your gite is graded to national standards and offers you tax benefits) at a preferential tariff. Indeed, they can also offer you tailor-made training according to your needs. This is something definitely worth knowing about as training is a very important aspect of Gite ownership. Many owners have had careers but are not necessarily from the tourism or hospitality industry. This is a very interesting point.

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Magical gites in France (just a hop across the Channel) https://normandylets.com/magical-gites-in-france-just-a-hop-across-the-channel/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 09:43:39 +0000 https://normandylets.com/magical-gites-in-france-just-a-hop-across-the-channel/ One of the pleasures of holidaying in France is that you don’t have to travel far to find the perfect place to stay – and these pretty gites are just a hop away across the Channel Ches Mouch in pretty Amiens is an elegant century-old cottage ideal for couples A unique place to stay in […]]]>

One of the pleasures of holidaying in France is that you don’t have to travel far to find the perfect place to stay – and these pretty gites are just a hop away across the Channel

  • Ches Mouch in pretty Amiens is an elegant century-old cottage ideal for couples
  • A unique place to stay in Rouen is Le Pigeonnier, a three-storey circular building that can accommodate up to seven people.
  • In Lens, the wooden huts of the Gites de l’Ecole Buissoniere revisit the traditional gite

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Each week, our holiday hero, Neil Simpson, takes an in-depth look at a brilliant holiday topic, doing all the groundwork so you don’t have to. This week: gites nearby.

One of the pleasures of vacationing in France is that you don’t have to travel far to find the perfect place to stay. Dozens of cottages – country estates converted into self-contained holiday accommodation – are a short drive from Chunnel’s main ports and ferries.

Two hours from Calais is Amiens, where a Gothic cathedral towers over pretty cobbled streets and hundreds of ‘floating gardens’ line a huge network of canals. Guided boat trips will take you to discover the greenest of them.

Elegant: Above, a room at the Ches Mouch in Amiens. Two-night stays cost from £245

Ches Mouch provides guests with a rowing boat to explore the waterways

Ches Mouch provides guests with a rowing boat to explore the waterways

Or explore them in the provided rowing boat (with free bikes) at Ches Mouch, a lodge in the heart of the waterways. The elegant century-old cottage is perfect for couples. Two-night stays from £245 (french-weekendbreaks.co.uk).

One hour from Dieppe and Le Havre is Rouen. The city’s skyline is once again dominated by a Gothic cathedral, a favorite subject of Claude Monet, whose works are exhibited in the city’s Museum of Fine Arts. There are also the twisted roofs of the Church of Joan of Arc in the Market Square where the young martyr was burned at the stake in 1431.

An equally unique lodge nearby is The Dovecote, a three-story circular building that can sleep up to seven people. There is a sun terrace in the walled garden and plenty of space to relax inside. From £1,005 for seven night stays (vrbo.com).

The Rouen dovecote (pictured) is spread over three floors and can accommodate up to seven people

The Rouen dovecote (pictured) is spread over three floors and can accommodate up to seven people

Cosy: The dovecote has plenty of space inside to relax

Cosy: The dovecote has plenty of space inside to relax

Just over an hour from Dunkirk is the former mining town of Lens, now reinvigorated by the state-of-the-art Louvre-Lens museum.

The interior of the long, low building resembles a spaceship with aluminum-clad walls, gently sloping gray floors, and dim lighting. The works brought back from Paris are skillfully staged to be seen from all angles.

Outside of town, a twist on the traditional lodge complements the museum’s modern architecture. At Gites de l’Ecole Buissoniere, a series of low-rise wooden cabins can be rented individually for couples and families or booked as one for larger group holidays.

There is plenty of space in the private gardens for barbecues and picnics and you can borrow boules for a game of pétanque. From £445 for seven nights in a two-bed property (gite-lens.fr).

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Week 4 on the Camino https://normandylets.com/week-4-on-the-camino/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 16:27:18 +0000 https://normandylets.com/week-4-on-the-camino/ Day 22 I must say that the Gers was not the best.Lots of road walking and not much else.I can’t wait to be in the Basque country. I only see a couple of Belgian pilgrims stopping their hike today.But when I call the gites in Aire-sur-l’Adour, they are full again!I just feel like I’m going […]]]>

Day 22

I must say that the Gers was not the best.
Lots of road walking and not much else.
I can’t wait to be in the Basque country.

I only see a couple of Belgian pilgrims stopping their hike today.
But when I call the gites in Aire-sur-l’Adour, they are full again!
I just feel like I’m going in and out of bubbles.

I am also looking forward to being in Spain, where the gite situation will be easier as there is no reservation system.

I go to look for food in town, then I leave with my headlamp towards a lake that I saw on the map.


Day 23

Got my first glimpse of the Pyrenees this morning.
It’s really exciting.
The Pyrenees are my favorite hiking playground (maybe along with Tasmania), and it’s always great to be here.
Even if in this case, I will only go hiking there for a day or two, I can’t wait to be there.

I’ve heard a lot of alarmist talk about crossing the Pyrenees, but given the weather we have, I can’t imagine that being a problem.
Moreover, on the Basque country side, it is definitely not a high mountain territory.

At lunch, I meet a pilgrim (the only one today) who says he has difficulty finding accommodation.
Because it’s vacation time, there are more people on the trail.
Which is weird because I haven’t seen almost anyone in days.

At the end of the day, I have an even better view of the mountain range, with the beautiful Pic de midi d’Ossau, and it makes me want to go back there as soon as possible to complete my “Triple Couronne Pyrénéenne” and hike. the HRP (the high road passing through the Pyrenees).

I only have three days left before Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port, the end of the Via Podiensis, and the start of the Camino Frances.

Day 24

I have the Pyrenees on the horizon for a good part of the day.

I started seeing lots of migrating birds at dusk and dawn the past few days. That’s hiker’s entertainment right there.

Another day with no pilgrims seen during the day.
I decide to stop at a lodge tonight so I can take a shower and charge my electronic devices.
It was only the four of us, Hervé from Lyon and two Swiss who started the Camino in Geneva.

I must say that I can’t wait to be in Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port.
I really need new shoes and socks.

Apparently they close the pass through the Pyrenees on November 1 whether there is snow or not.
It’s a good time. I should be there a few days before.
Although it is possible to walk around, but it will be nice to walk up there.


Day 25

I hadn’t realized it, but I entered the Basque country yesterday.

I don’t feel well this morning.
I feel really tired and I have a headache, kinda sounds like a hangover, but I haven’t had a beer in ages, actually.

I arrive in Navarrenx, where I stock up, get myself an energy drink, and take some aspirin.
I feel much better after that.
I go to the tourist office to have my pilgrim passport stamped, but I can’t find it.
It’s a real disappointment.
It’s a great souvenir, and I’ve also heard that you can’t stay in certain places in Spain if you don’t have it.

At noon, it is ridiculously hot.
Really hard to believe that November is just around the corner.
I don’t remember ever seeing such weather in France.

As I sit on a bench in a forest for lunch, I am joined by three pilgrims.
They are absolutely horrified that I walk 40 km a day and tell me I can’t have fun.
I always have a hard time being polite to people who feel comfortable enough to tell you that you’re walking the wrong way.
But I do.

Later in the afternoon, I make a short detour to Aroue to fetch water.
I see a lodge that has a large picnic table, so I stop for a snack break.
It is full of pilgrims.
I don’t remember seeing so many in one place.
The person who works there tells me about a chapel where it is possible to sleep a little further.
Sounds good, so I keep walking for two hours.
And this piece is the best section of trail I’ve had in a while.
It’s a beautiful Basque country, with green hills and great views of the Pyrenees.
And a good sunset doesn’t hurt.


Day 26

Last day on the Via Podiensis and last day of walking in France!

In the morning, I pass in front of a small chapel which offers a very beautiful 360° view of the Basque country and the Pyrenees.

I meet a few pilgrims today, including one… going the other way.
He walked to Santiago by the way of Tours and turned around to return home.
It’s pretty cool.
The Tours route is different from the one I’m taking, but this close to Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port, all the routes start to merge.

Then I finally arrive at Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port, where I will take my first zero.
I was also here a year ago, as the GR 10 (crossing the French Pyrenees) passes through SJPDP.
I was only days away from completing a 5.5 month/5300km trek through France that ended up being the most epic/difficult thing I’ve ever done.
It is a beautiful Basque town that is definitely worth spending a zero.


Day 27

First zero!
I thought I was alone in the gite, but being woken up by two screaming children, I realize that I am not.
So much for a sleep-in.

In the evening, I meet Han, a Chinese pilgrim.
He got stuck in Europe when Covid started and decided to stay because he can work on his computer.
He’s a really cool guy and he studied cinema, which suits me perfectly.
More people come later, it’s very international.
Han tells me that he saw many pilgrims in town.
It’s a public holiday, so many people come for a 3-4 day trek, stopping in Pamplona.


Day 28

At the exit of the city, I come across a young Bordelais who is hiking for 3 days.
We walk together for an hour before a car stops and announces that there is a fire and that they risk closing the pass towards Spain.
We are undecided, but we finally keep walking.
After a while, another car stops and tells us that the path is closed and that we have to go back to Saint-Jean-Pied-de-Port.
All the hikers around me are still going up which is odd considering they were all told the trail was closed.
I turn around and look at the map.
There is a way to cut and rejoin the winter road which is open.

At noon, I am on the winter road, and I see a sign indicating that I am only 16km from Roncesvalles, the first Spanish city.
I thought this detour would make access difficult today, but it’s not so bad after all.

I see many pilgrims, some very unprepared, wearing street clothes and street shoes.
Guess that’s normal on a trail that could see half a million people this year.
And the Camino is definitely a great trail to make any beginner mistakes.

I hike with a lady from Alabama for a while, then later I bump into Han, so we end the day of hiking with a lady from Wisconsin as well.
She is very surprised when I mention the Ice Age Trail because she has never heard anyone other than Wisconsin mention this trail.

We separate in Burguete, because the Albergue where we had planned to stop is full.
I will continue to walk and camp, but Han goes to a place 2 km from town where there are dormitories.

It’s funny, I realize that I was in Burguete 2 years ago while browsing the GR 11 (which crosses the Spanish Pyrenees).
On the same day, I crossed paths with the GR 11 and the GR 10 (the one that crosses the French Pyrenees), which I rode last year as the epic conclusion of my long crossing of France.

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“No running water, wi-fi and a severe asthma attack – but still no refund from my Booking.com hotel” | Travel https://normandylets.com/no-running-water-wi-fi-and-a-severe-asthma-attack-but-still-no-refund-from-my-booking-com-hotel-travel/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 23:01:00 +0000 https://normandylets.com/no-running-water-wi-fi-and-a-severe-asthma-attack-but-still-no-refund-from-my-booking-com-hotel-travel/ ✉ I made two back-to-back bookings with Booking.com to stay at Palazzo Presta in Gallipoli, Italy in September. They cost around £3300 and my plan was that if I didn’t like it I would have time to cancel the second booking. On the train from Rome, the hotel messaged me that there was no running […]]]>

✉ I made two back-to-back bookings with Booking.com to stay at Palazzo Presta in Gallipoli, Italy in September. They cost around £3300 and my plan was that if I didn’t like it I would have time to cancel the second booking. On the train from Rome, the hotel messaged me that there was no running water and that I had to stay at another hotel for one night. When I finally arrived my room had a strong smell even though I had warned them that I was very allergic to room odors. I asked to be moved but they refused and I had an asthma attack during the night. The next day I was transferred to another hotel, without a phone in the room, no wi-fi and no reception. I had no way of contacting a doctor. I was told that was the only option available. After further issues with hot water and wi-fi, I told Palazzo Presta that I wanted to leave and needed a refund. But he refused to refund both bookings and Booking.com said there was nothing he could do. Can you help ?
Pippa Bell

The hotel has apologized for the inconvenience but insists it has done its best to help you, including cleaning your room with fragrance-free products and offering you a partial refund for the plumbing problem. as well as payment for your mobile data; he still sees no reason to offer a refund. But Booking.com came to the rescue. He said that although he pleaded on your behalf to get your money back, he could see there were missed opportunities to “support you appropriately” and issued a full refund.

Gallipoli, Italy

GETTY PICTURES

✉ In 2019 we booked a holiday to India which was moved and moved until the departure date was set for November 30, 2022. In 2019 we checked which visa was required; it was an e-visa that was only valid for a month, so we figured there was no need to get one until later. We were now told by our travel agent that we needed a paper visa (and should have checked this) but when we tried to get an appointment there was none available for the rest of the year. We asked Imagine Cruising if we could move the vacation but were told it would be very expensive. Would we be covered by our insurance if we have to cancel because we can’t get a visa (but not for lack of trying)? We are about to lose £5,000 each.
Sandra Sheldon

India’s suspension of e-visas for UK travelers has taken its toll and unfortunately insurance policies will not cover cancellations under these circumstances. The good news is that Imagine is now offering options for all customers who are unable to secure a visa in time for November and December itineraries that include land stays in India. “I can confirm that any customer affected by this situation will be able to move their holidays to India to dates in 2023 or receive a full refund. We are contacting all customers individually to discuss which option meets their needs,” a spokeswoman said.

An orangutan in Borneo

An orangutan in Borneo

GETTY PICTURES

✉ I just graduated as a lawyer and I have a month off to travel in January. I am a female traveling alone and am planning to spend ten days in Borneo or Papua New Guinea. Should I go on an organized trip? Would you recommend one over the other?
Ilana Granditer

If you can only travel in January, neither Borneo nor Papua New Guinea is a great choice: it’s the peak rainy season either way. But if you have your heart set on one of the two, then Borneo would be both more economical and more suitable for single women (group tours are hard to find this month). Considering the long flight and domestic travel required, I would suggest spending more than ten days there if possible; this would allow you time to visit must-see sites such as the Danum Valley, the Kinabatangan River and the famous Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Center. Regent Holidays offers a private 13-night Borneo Orangutan Experience tour that starts at £4,562 for a single traveler, including all flights and transport, most meals and guides. If the wet weather puts you off, Regent suggests Vietnam or Cambodia instead, where January conditions are much more reliable and there are group tours year-round. A ten-day tour of Vietnam’s classic highlights in Hanoi, Halong Bay, Hoi An, Hue and Ho Chi Minh City on January 4 starts at £2,015 for a single traveler, including flights, transport , some meals, guide and entrance fees (regent-holidays.co.uk).

Best destinations for women traveling alone
Best tours for solo travelers

The medieval center of Dinan, France

The medieval center of Dinan, France

ALAMY

✉ I will be 80 next summer and I want to take the family to France for a week from August 19th. There will be 12 of us (including two children) and I would like a dining table large enough to have breakfast together, a swimming pool and a barbecue. I hope to find a place with varied entertainment to suit the age groups within comfortable distances and we would prefer a journey of less than five hours from Calais. What do you suggest?
Helen Doling

The creeper-clad Manoir du Bourg in the northern Brittany village of Sainte-Hélène, a five-hour drive from Calais (and half an hour from the ferry port of Saint-Malo), takes you would make you sleep in style. It has six comfortable bedrooms, a heated outdoor swimming pool, barbecue and tennis court, as well as a fishing lake a few minutes walk away, something to keep everyone busy. Dinan, with its medieval ramparts, half-timbered houses and cobbled streets, is about 13 km away. A week in August costs £6,250 (gites.co.uk). Also about five hours from Calais, and very close to the beaches of St Malo, is a manor house in Pleudihen-sur-Rance with enough space for you all to spread out. It has 11 rooms and ticks your boxes with a pool, hot tub, game room, and space, indoors and outdoors, for leisurely family breakfasts. A week in August costs £5,423 (property 6314079, vrbo.com).

Best UK Hotels with Accessible Rooms

✉ My wife and I would like to go to the New Forest for the weekend in January with our dog but we would need an accessible room and I’m struggling to find a suitable place that isn’t too expensive: our budget n is no more than £175 a night. Do you have any suggestions?
Paul Samson

Try Woodlands Lodge, a former royal hunting lodge in three acres of gardens near Lyndhurst on the edge of the New Forest, where a pet-friendly junior suite on the ground floor would cost £300 for two nights for a January weekend (forests-lodge.co.uk). It is listed on the new RightRooms.co website, which allows travelers to search for hotels in the UK in detail, whether they want accessible rooms, baby-friendly facilities or local food.

If you have a complaint, suggestion or question regarding your holiday, please email traveldoctor@thetimes.co.uk

Sign up for our Times Travel newsletter and follow us on Instagram and Twitter

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Week 3 on the Camino https://normandylets.com/week-3-on-the-camino/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 10:24:06 +0000 https://normandylets.com/week-3-on-the-camino/ Day 15 Another day spent mostly in a beautiful forest.It’s flat and easy, the sun is shining, it’s one of those cruise control days.What I appreciate.I have to say though that it’s October 16th and it’s really weird how hot it is. No nice villages today but I pass by Labastide-Murat at lunchtime and hope […]]]>

Day 15

Another day spent mostly in a beautiful forest.
It’s flat and easy, the sun is shining, it’s one of those cruise control days.
What I appreciate.
I have to say though that it’s October 16th and it’s really weird how hot it is.

No nice villages today but I pass by Labastide-Murat at lunchtime and hope to get my hands on some famous Rocamadour goat cheese.
I find some, but there is no more bread.
This is exactly what happened yesterday when I was in Rocamadour.
Well, hopefully tomorrow, when I get back to Cahors, I should be able to find both.

In the evening I reconnect with a section that I had already covered at the start of the alternative Célé five days ago.
But after about 5 km I will do an alternative within the alternative, so I won’t do too many kilometers.


Day 16

It’s a very nice walk along the Lot before returning to Cahors.
Finally, here I am back on the track and on the GR 65, after having covered the section between Figeac and Cahors three times!

Leaving Cahors, I spot a very familiar sticker on a post.

It is the one used as a landmark during the Shikoku 88 temple pilgrimage in Japan.
Not sure how this sticker ended up here, but it certainly brings back memories of hiking this trail in 2015.

There are some pretty dark clouds and of course it starts to rain when I stop for lunch. And stop when I’m done.
It clears up and gets really hot.
Which, again, is crazy on October 17th.

I realize that yesterday was my first day without seeing a single pilgrim and I haven’t seen any today either.
Until I saw one in the afternoon walking into a grocery store with the biggest backpack I had ever seen.
Without judging, we’ve all been there.
But man, it’s big.

While I’m looking for places to host the data for the hiking app I’m working on, a lady asks me if I’m lost.
I tell her what I’m doing and right away she says aggressively that people shouldn’t be spending so much time on their phone talking to each other.
I tell him that while that’s a valid point, I don’t know how it’s relevant to a navigation app and what I’m currently doing.
She keeps bitching, so I wish her a good day, put my headphones on, and keep walking.
Life is too short to talk with aggressive idiots.

As I prepare to leave Lascabane, I see that a gîte is open and ask if there is a bed left. They do.
There are only four pilgrims in the lodge.
And out of four, two are Swiss.
The Swiss love to hike.
I remember how amazed I was on the PCT to meet way more hikers from Switzerland than from any other country (apart from the US of course)
It’s nice to have company for the evening.


Day 17

What a day.
It looks like a real summer day.
I think it’s getting hotter every day, it’s so weird…

I arrive in a city famous in France… for its name.
It’s called Montcuq, which translates to Myass.
Every possible joke has been made about this place and it is indeed difficult to have a sentence that does not sound weird if it contains the name of the city.

Montcuq is actually really nice. You could say that Myass is definitely not a shithole.
Sorry about that… I had to make one.
But it’s actually a nice place.

The lady at the tourist office is super talkative and I stay there for quite a while.
I try to go to a tourist office a day to get my pilgrim passport stamped.

Then, I meet a lot of pilgrims.
I finally leave town planning to go to lunch at the next one, Lauzerte.

Along the way, a nice farmer gives me small peppers, perfect for my sandwich.
Then I meet a Kiwi pilgrim whom I take for an Aussie because of the accent.
That’s a big no-no and I should know better as I lived in both countries.
We talk about trails in New Zealand and Australia, and soon realize that we live in the same place in Australia.
And of all places, Katerine is a random little town in the middle of nowhere.
We are so amazed at this coincidence that we miss a marker and walk a good 20 minutes in the wrong direction.

I finally arrive in Lauzerte, which is another beautiful village, for a late lunch.
In town I meet more pilgrims and talkers.
Everyone seems to be lovely and in a really chatty mood today, maybe it’s the sun.
It’s awesome and definitely the most social day I’ve had since the start.

I see more pilgrims afterwards, including one who goes to Santiago by bike.
After not seeing a single pilgrim two days ago, today is the day I saw the most, which is surprising as I thought a lot of people stopped in Conques.


Day 18

As I walk on the side of a small road in a forest, I see someone walking his dog, coming in my direction.
I can see something is wrong, but I can’t put my finger on it from afar.
As we get closer, I see he has his hoodie on and is wearing some sort of paper plate as a mask.
He acts a little weird too.
I have my hiking poles ready to punch him in the face if need be, but he keeps walking, making weird body gestures.
I am now 50 yards from him and I hear the weirdest laughter possible.
Imagine the worst actor in a Z movie trying to laugh like a psychopath.
That’s it.
There’s no point in speculating who this guy is and what he’s up to, but after about an hour I regretted not reporting him to the police.
I can’t even imagine what a 12 year old would think upon meeting this guy in the woods.
And just to be clear, it definitely wasn’t a Halloween costume.
Anyway, it was different…

Another that I let you translate…

The rest of the day it’s just me trying to get over this weirdo.
Oh and the cathedral in Moissac is stunning.
And the track became calmer again.
Only saw one lost pilgrim from Quebec today.


Day 19

I start the day with a visit to the beautiful village of Auvillar.
Some villages in France obtain the label “One of the most beautiful villages in France”, and this is one.
Well, it kind of feels like one a day, which is really cool.

The rest of the day is spent through plowed fields, which may seem like the worst scenery to drive through.
But somehow, with the beautiful autumn light, there is a kind of beauty.
I guess I’m easily satisfied on trail.
As long as I don’t come across a boogeyman from a John Carpenter movie, I’m happy.

I decide to stay in a gite in Lectoure.
I join Louis, another pilgrim for dinner in town.
Some restaurants have a cheap, filling pilgrim menu, which I haven’t tried yet.
It is indeed a very good deal.
Louis started the Camino on day 1 of his retirement, which is a great way to start a new life on the right foot!

Then later I meet my first Camino addict, an Austrian who has walked many different routes and also walked the Via Francigena, another pilgrimage from Canterbury in England to Rome (and further if you wish)
This one I would like to do one day.
Sounds like a great way to explore Italy.


Day 20

A bit boring day today.
A few showers, no pilgrims and it’s mostly road walking.

I arrive at Condom in the afternoon.
Looks like the Camino has an endless list of towns with funny names.
It doesn’t stop there.
At the exit of the city, you cross the Baïse.
Which translates to… well, Google translates it.

Condom has no water point, toilets or grocery store in town.
I have to make a big detour just to buy a bottle of water for the evening.


Day 21

I start the day with a short detour to visit Larressingle, the smallest fortified village in France.

It is indeed very small, but very pretty.
And it’s kind of cool to be there at dawn.
The trail is closed for a good part, making a long and boring detour before reaching Eauze.
It’s so hot that I’m going to eat ice cream.
It’s my favorite treat in town, but I never thought I’d still be eating ice cream on October 22.

I keep walking until dusk and am about ready to stop and pitch the tent, when I see a sign for a pilgrim stop just five minutes away.
I’m expecting picnic tables with room for tents, but this is actually a donativo, a lodge where you’re free to pay what you want.
The host couple and their children are already eating, with a neighbor and a pilgrim.
I have to say I didn’t expect this and I’m not sure what to do but they tell me I can join them for dinner so I do and then tell them why I was a bit surprised that I couldn’t just find a picnic table.
They think it’s funny that I had no idea it was a gite and realize the sign could be confusing.

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Where to go stargazing in France https://normandylets.com/where-to-go-stargazing-in-france/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 23:15:00 +0000 https://normandylets.com/where-to-go-stargazing-in-france/ In July 2021, the City of Lights went dark – or at least it was supposed to. France’s environment ministry, which aimed to make the country a dark-sky pioneer, had issued a decree requiring all shops and offices in Paris to turn off their lights at night. But the law, originally introduced in 2020, has […]]]>

In July 2021, the City of Lights went dark – or at least it was supposed to. France’s environment ministry, which aimed to make the country a dark-sky pioneer, had issued a decree requiring all shops and offices in Paris to turn off their lights at night. But the law, originally introduced in 2020, has been ignored by many big fashion companies and brands, which use their neon signs in the City of Lights as free advertising.

Enter the Parisian parkour collective and guerrilla activists, On The Spot, who have decided to take matters into their own hands. Its members scaled walls and scaffolding to turn off neon signs themselves, a rebellious act that helped raise awareness of the city’s light pollution problem.

Dubbed “Lights Out Paris”, the movement eventually spread across the city. Authorities even darkened the Eiffel Tower, replacing light bulbs and spotlights with modern LED technology, which reduced energy by up to 80%, and reduced the twinkling effect of the tower from 10 to 5 minutes per hour.

It’s all part of the larger Dark Skies movement, which started in the southwestern United States in the 1970s but has taken off globally in recent years, with a constellation of new sky reserves certified stars that are opening in places like Israel, Croatia, Brazil and Japan. . Europe, the most light-polluted continent, has jumped on the night sky preservation bandwagon, led by France.

Since 2020, France has adopted the strictest and most progressive light pollution policies on the planet: imposing mild curfews; reduce light pollution; drastically reducing dazzling blue light emissions and outright banning lasers, sky beams, lighted waterways and other light “intrusions”. Even stricter rules are expected in 2023. The country has also developed a network of International Dark Sky Reserves, places to nurture your inner stargazer abroad.

France’s four dark sky reserves – Réserves de Ciel Etoilé or RICE for short – form a necklace in the southern half of the country where the skies are generally clearer. These are dream locations during the autumn meteor showers – Orionids (September 26 – November 22), Taurids (September 28 – December 2), Leonids (November 3 – December 2) and Gemenids (November 19 – December 24) – and also parks worthy of a destination where you can appreciate the great biodiversity and nature of France under the stars. Here’s everything you need to know about France’s Dark Sky Reserves.

Head to the south of France to see the stars shine at Lac d’Allos in the Mercantour National Park.

Photo by Elementals/Shutterstock

1. Alpes Azur Mercantour Dark Sky Reserve

The Alpes Azur Mercantour Dark Sky Reserve is located in Provence, about 30 minutes northeast of Nice. The 888-square-mile reserve was designated a Dark Sky Reserve in 2019 – the third in France – and is home to a particularly diverse set of nocturnal creatures, including wolves, fireflies, bats and moths. Also part of the reserve are: 75 municipalities that follow strict light emission rules, allowing more than 3,000 stars to be observed here.

Since the 19th century, the region, which includes the Mercantour National Park, has been considered an epicenter of astronomy. There is thus a network of six professional and amateur astronomy sites, including the ruins of the Mont Mounier Observatory, the Plateau de Calern and the Vallon de la Moutière, which houses a hypertelescope.

Even the famous beach clubs of Saint-Tropez, located in the village of Ramatuelle 30 minutes from the park, have transformed from party zones to plastic-free places that strictly limit light and noise pollution.

In 2019 the government forced club owners to rebuild the historic 27 beach clubs, removing four clubs in the process, to help reduce light pollution. The 23 new clubs – La Reserve, Cheval Blanc and Byblos, to name a few – have been built with sustainable kit materials, have banned plastic altogether and have strict light emission laws. While swimming and sunbathing are still the main focus, they have become romantic places to watch sunsets, full moonrises and meteor showers.

Where to stay

White Earth: About 20 minutes from the park, Terre Blanche is a low-key luxury resort set on a rolling slope planted with native Provençal plants like Aleppo and maritime pine, wild thyme and lavender. The property is a leader in dark sky conservation: it uses motion sensors throughout the resort, dims all trail lights at night, and has built lightless migration corridors for nocturnal animals, among other things.

The resort’s villa terraces are geared towards stargazing, and at night the lights automatically turn off, allowing travelers to keep an eye out for red dwarfs and blue supergiants (while sipping a glass of local rosé, of course). ). In addition, Terre Blanche’s two 18-hole golf courses, which occasionally host stargazing events, are arguably the greenest in the world: they are 100% organic and pesticide-free and, soon, they will be completely without light.

2. Cevennes National Park

The sprawling 1,148 square mile Cévennes National Park was designated an International Dark Sky Reserve in 2018. Located on the southeastern flank of the Massif Central, a mountainous region of mountains, plateaus and hills , densely wooded with old-growth forests – the park is also a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve with 2,300 plants and 2,410 animals, more species than anywhere else in France.

Hiking, wildlife viewing, camping, canoeing, and rafting are popular, but stargazing is on the rise. Astro-pilgrims are particularly drawn to the Mont Aigoual meteorological observatory, where amateur astronomers regularly gather for informal stargazing hikes, to spot comets and meteors, or simply to get a better look at the belt of Orion.

Where to stay

The park partners with organizations that offer dark sky-friendly accommodation ranging from furnished bivoacs, cabins and campsites to lodges (small vacation homes) and bed and breakfasts. You can even sleep in a glass pyramid or embark on a six-night star-focused mountain journey with donkeys.

3. Pic du Midi Reserve

The Pic du Midi Reserve in the Pyrenees, certified Dark Sky Reserve in 2013, offers nighttime programs for visitors who want a deep and intimate connection with galaxies and other celestial objects. The wheelchair-accessible reserve is accessible via a cable car from La Mongie, at the foot of the Col du Tourmalet, and is home to an astronomy museum, planetarium, mountain bike trails and a traditional restaurant serving trout and lamb local. If the park is a refuge for bears, lizards, capercaillies, chamoix and bearded vultures (the largest raptor in the region), it also serves as a summer pasture for cows, source of Pyrenean tommes.

Where to stay

The Pic du Midi partners with the NGO Starwatch Group Ferme des Étoiles to bring guests to the observatory for nighttime experiences. Guests stay in comfortable rooms designed for visiting astronomers and climatologists and begin with sunset cocktails, followed by a chef’s tasting dinner and astronomy session at the Charvin Dome Observatory where the 400mm Smith-Cassegrain Telescope awaits (single rooms from $469). You can have a less ornate dinner at the top of the mountain for $29. La Ferme des Étoiles also offers seven to nine day astronomy camps for children 8 to 17 years old.

4. Regional Natural Park of Millevaches

This park, designated a Dark Sky Preserve in 2021, is located in Limousine, marked by a moody landscape of heather moorland, bogs, wetlands and old hardwood forests home to otters, pearl mussels, blue-eyed wetlands and linnets. The birds and flora are particularly diverse, with white-tailed eagles, nightjars and larks flying around sphagnum moss and sundews. The park is also one of the best places to view the Milky Way with the naked eye; the average measurement of night sky brightness at the zenith here is 21.6 mag/arcsec, which in layman’s terms means it’s so dark you can see the glow of distant stars.

Where to stay

Those who spend the night stargazing are spoiled for choice: Park-affiliated accommodations include a ranch, donkey farm, lodges, self-catering lodges and cottages. Creatives can also seek out the artist’s residence on Île de Vassivière, a remote, forested lake island. Paid residencies aim to bring artists to the park to raise awareness of the vanishing night sky and illustrate nightscapes so that stargazers can enjoy the wilderness of our universe for generations to come.

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Can course regular Publisher Du Gite secure another win for Cheltenham? | Horse racing news https://normandylets.com/can-course-regular-publisher-du-gite-secure-another-win-for-cheltenham-horse-racing-news/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 18:09:42 +0000 https://normandylets.com/can-course-regular-publisher-du-gite-secure-another-win-for-cheltenham-horse-racing-news/ John Grossick (racingpost.com/photos) ” title=”Publisher Du Gite: has a great record at Cheltenham” class=”js-imageLoader” data-at-xn=”https://www.rp-assets.com/images/news/2021/12/12 /102178-medium.jpeg” data-br-n=”https://www.rp-assets.com/images/news/2021/12/12/102178-medium.jpeg” data-br-m=”https ://www.rp-assets.com/images/news/2021/12/12/102178-large.jpeg” data-br-w=”https://www.rp-assets.com/images/news/ 2021/12/12/102178-large.jpeg” data-br-xw=”https://www.rp-assets.com/images/news/2021/12/12/102178-large.jpeg” onclick=” returns false ;”> Publisher Du Gite: has a good track record in Cheltenham John Grossick (racingpost.com/photos) By Graeme Rodway and James Stevens UPDATED AT 7:09 PM, OCTOBER 21, 2022 Saturday: 3.15 Cheltenham888Sport […]]]>

John Grossick (racingpost.com/photos)

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Publisher Du Gite: has a good track record in Cheltenham

John Grossick (racingpost.com/photos)

By Graeme Rodway and James Stevens

Saturday: 3.15 Cheltenham
888Sport Handicap Chase | 2m | 4yrs+ | TVI/RTV

Editor Du Gite became a bit of a Cheltenham specialist last season, winning the 2m handicap pursuit at the November meeting before following in the December game. He then finished fourth in the Grand Annual in March and it was on desperate ground.

L’Editeur Du Gite is at its best when the property appears in the current description, so relations are hoping that there will be no more significant rain. They fought well on the obstacle course on Friday, but the pursuit course sometimes goes better.

The Widdow Maker seems more versatile. He proved it by finishing sixth over a hot handicap obstacle on practice day at this course in January on good ground and showed he could handle it softer when successful on his debut hunt for Exeter in February.

He finished third in the Grade 1 Manifesto Novices’ Chase at the Aintree Grand National meeting in April and, although it is probably the weakest high level event of the whole season, he is still fit in the context of this disability.

The two-mile drop also promises to suit The Widdow Maker. He has continued racing over the past season, including this Year 1 at Aintree, and the faster they go the better he should be racing.

Clear The Runway won five in the summer rotation. Three chase wins and two hurdle wins highlight his versatility, but this race usually draws a much stronger field than he faced.

Fox Norton, Saint Calvados and Rouge Vif all won it in the last six years before impacting the graded races and that gives some idea of ​​the quality that was presented.

Dads Lad is unlikely to be in that class, but he will be Willie Mullins’ first runner of the Cheltenham season and his only representative on the card. Brian Hughes is only booked for his third race for the team and is looking for his first winner.
Race analysis by Graeme Rodway


‘He’s my idol’ – Morgan relishes Mullins clash

Laura Morgan admits she may feel a little dazzled sending a runner against Willie Mullins at Cheltenham, but she’s confident she can beat her training ‘idol’ with the prolific Clear The Runway.

The six-year-old, who belongs to former Premier League defender Alan Rogers, has had an incredible run since February, striking seven times to leave a mark of 98 far behind him.

John Grossick (racingpost.com/photos)

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Clear The Runway: Looking for a sixth straight win

Clear The Runway: Looking for a sixth straight win

John Grossick (racingpost.com/photos)

He is now handicapped almost three stones more after his last easy victory, and fifth in a row, at Worcester last month and is looking to give his blossoming coach a special first win at Cheltenham.

“It would be a great story for a small yard, but it’s a little nerve-wracking,” Morgan said. “It’s a bit scary going up against the big guns, Willie Mullins is my absolute idol. How can he not be? The guy just produces freshman winners year after year.

“Clear The Runway always worked hard on canters, but he was a little nervous. I think he’s just grown and matured and learned to run properly now. He’s changed so much.

“I thought he was very impressive at Worcester, he couldn’t have done better and he was also coming back from a break. I think a steep two miles will really suit him. We’re hoping for a great race.”


What they say

Gary Moore, trainer of the Editor Du Gite
He likes beautiful grounds, I hope he does, and I can’t wait to get him going again. I think Aintree was a bit too far at the end of the season but we are back to handicaps where I think we are best.

Joe Tizzard, trainer of The Widdow Maker
He had a good run in his freshman year at Aintree last time out. I think it’s on a pretty high note, but it’s also doable. He seems to be going very fresh and likes this better ground.

Oliver Greenall, co-trainer of El Borracho
He seems to come back fresh every time he runs, so we thought we’d give it a shot. Since Wetherby he has come back very well and continues to improve. He will love the floor.
Reporting by James Stevens


Saturday previews:

2.05 Cheltenham: ‘He was unlucky not to win last year’ – who imagines his chances at Cheltenham?

2.40 Cheltenham: Pied Piper or Knight’s Salute: Who Will Win in a Classic Trilogy?

3.35 Doncaster: ‘We want to run’ – but O’Brien wary of pitch for heavy favorite Auguste Rodin

3.50 Cheltenham: Can Charles Byrnes and his son strike another blow for the Irish with Shoot First?

Newbury: ‘Looks like a race he can win’ – Hamish ready to give Haggas another St Simon

Leopardstown: Hippodrome looks to be main hope as Aidan O’Brien targets 12th Eyrefield Stakes


Did you miss it? The Big Jump Off has everything you need to get excited for the 2022-23 National Hunt season. It features 72 pages of unbeatable content, including ante-post advice, guest columnists, split analysis and more. Order now.


FIRST PUBLICATION AT 6:00 PM, OCTOBER 21, 2022

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