Police investigate ‘unexplained’ death of Royal Navy serviceman at Faslane nuclear submarine base in UK


Police are investigating the “unexplained” death of a Royal Navy serviceman at the UK nuclear submarine base.

Emergency services were dispatched to Faslane on the Clyde around 12:30 p.m. yesterday following the tragedy.

The Royal Navy said it was “aware of an incident” but declined to comment further, according to Sky News.

Faslane inspired the fictional base used in the hit BBC drama Vigil, starring Suranne Jones and Martin Compston, and in the James Bond film The Spy Who Loved Me, The Secret Agent – then played by Roger Moore – was informed of the submarines at Faslane.

Police investigate ‘unexplained’ death of Royal Navy serviceman at UK nuclear submarine base

Emergency services were dispatched to Faslane on the Clyde around 12:30 p.m. yesterday following the tragedy.

Scottish police are investigating the death and said an autopsy would now be carried out to establish exactly what had happened.

A spokesperson said: “At around 12:30 pm on Thursday, December 9, officers were called to Faslane Naval Base following the death of a man.

“A post-mortem examination will be performed to establish the exact cause of death, which is currently considered unexplained.

‘A report will be submitted to the Tax Prosecutor.’

The SNP warned the government earlier this year that it would reject any attempt to keep Britain’s nuclear submarines north of the border if there is a vote for independence.

It recently emerged that the Department of Defense had considered the possibility of leasing its existing nuclear sites in the west of Scotland to the Scottish government if the nation voted to separate from the UK.

The suggestion was reportedly dubbed “nuclear Gibraltar” by insiders, in what was a nod to British territory at the southern tip of the Iberian Peninsula, which is bordered by Spain.

The UK’s four nuclear submarines, armed with Trident missiles since 1996, have been based at HMNB Clyde in Faslane since 1968. A secondary base in Coulport, less than ten miles away, is where missiles are regularly stored. .

About 6,500 people are employed at Faslane, and another 200 at Coulport. But ministers are said to have drawn up plans to move ships to naval bases in the United States or France in the event of the Union breaking up.

Faslane inspired the fictional base used in the hit BBC drama Vigil, starring Suranne Jones and Martin Compston (pictured)

In the James Bond film The Spy Who Loved Me, the secret agent – then played by Roger Moore – was told about the subs at Faslane

According to the Financial Times, the Defense Department has also considered moving the home of nuclear submarines to France, even to the United States. They may also move to the Royal Navy’s Devonport base in Plymouth.

But SNP defense spokesman Stewart McDonald said nuclear bases in Scotland would be phased out “at pace” after an independence vote and defiantly added that the country “would not be home to any nuclear weapons”.

While HMNB Clyde at Faslane is the home base for the submarines themselves, the Royal Naval Armaments Depot at Coulport is responsible for the storage, processing and maintenance of missiles when not loaded on sub -marines.

The Royal Navy’s association with Faslane – which sits on the east side of Loch Station – dates back to WWI.

It was in the loch that the steam-powered HMS K13 sank in 1917 after its engine room was flooded during sea trials.

During World War II, large piers and a railroad were built at Faslane to accommodate the arrivals of troops and supplies on large ships from across the Atlantic.

After the conflict ended in 1945, the base was used to demolish old naval ships. The last battleship to be scrapped in Britain, HMS Vanguard, was dismantled at Faslane in 1962. The base was also used as a home for submarines.

But its long and controversial link with nuclear weapons began in 1968, after naval chiefs and politicians decided that the UK should have its own deadly deterrent amid threats posed by the Soviet Union. during the Cold War.

On May 10, 1968, following the Polaris sales agreement with the United States – which authorized Royal Navy submarines to carry deadly UGM-27 nuclear missiles – the new Faslane nuclear base was established.

Then known as HMS Neptune, it was opened by the Queen Mother. Later that year, the first patrol was carried out by HMS Resolution, which launched in 1963 and was the first of four Resolution-class submarines.

The following year the UK embarked on the policy that remains in place today – Continuous Deterrence at Sea (CASD).

While details were top secret when the operation began, it is now common knowledge that one of the four nuclear submarines is guaranteed to be deployed at some point.

Faslane’s long and controversial link with nuclear weapons began in 1968, after naval chiefs and politicians decided that the UK should have its own deadly deterrent amid threats posed by the Union Soviet Union during the Cold War. Above: The base in 1967

In 1969, the United Kingdom embarked on the policy that remains in place today – Continuous Deterrence at Sea (CASD). Above: Faslane in the 1980s

On May 10, 1968, following the Polaris sales agreement with the United States – which authorized Royal Navy submarines to carry deadly UGM-27 nuclear missiles – the new Faslane nuclear base was established. Later that year, the first patrol was carried out by HMS Resolution (above), which launched in 1963 and was the first of four Resolution-class submarines.

If Britain were to move its nuclear submarines, they could be based in Britain, northern France, or even the United States.

The second submarine used for the Polaris program was HMS Renown, which launched in 1964. It was followed by HMS Revenge in May 1965 and HMS Repulse in June of the same year.

Resolution-class submarines and their Polaris missiles began to be phased out in 1992, when the first of four Vanguard submarines was built. They had to wear the new Trident system, which is still in place today.

The four submarines carrying Trident missiles are HMS Vanguard, HMS Victorious, HMS Vigilant, and HMS Vengeance.

Each missile carried on the submarines has warheads which are more powerful than the bombs dropped on the Japanese city of Hiroshima during World War II.

The reasoning behind the UK’s nuclear weapons base at Faslane centered on the fact that it is deep, easy to navigate, and provides easy access to the North Atlantic.

However, the decision to place nuclear weapons on British soil met with stiff opposition from anti-nuclear activists. Hundreds of protests have taken place in the decades since the arrival of the guns.


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